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20130101
20130131
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
down the iron curtain and changing the entry into the eu of those countries that lost so many of their use to communism. and contained in this history is the crucial point about britain, about our national character, about our attitude to europe. britain is characterized not just by its independence but above all, by its openness. we have always been a country that reaches out that turns its face to the world that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. this is britain today, as it's always been. independent, yes, but open, too. i never want us to pull up the drawbridge and retreat from the world. i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe, too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants, and should want, to play a committed and active part. now, some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the mi
a poll in frons show those in the uk would prefer to leave the eu. we are waiting on the results from italy's latest debt auction. it will be two years of a zero coupon and five years of an italian linked paper. we'll get the results coming up in just a moment. here is a check of the european markets. we have seen them particular to the upside. now with the exception of spain trying to fight back into the green this morning, bolstered basically by the general risk on attitude. perhaps some of the credit flows, some of the equity fund flows boosting stock markets around the world. here is a look at who is leading the index this morning. onte paschi is on the top of the board, up 6.35%. today it's continued to snap back on hopes of.continued investor returnings. asml, elements which help make computer chips is up about 4%. it has been upgraded. it's viewed as a winner here in the mobile phone wars as more continue to shift to that market. sbm offshore, peugeot, tnt express towards top of the pack. at the bottom, it's a different story. down 3.5% o a downgrade, some other companies there
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
to hopkinson said this water tastes funny and hopkins said of course it does, it's got a whiskey in it. its e.u. a judge of water. last night and then, you know, he would do these things like -- off in odd note to winston churchill essay deerwood then, happy for dave. how old are you anyway? that's the kind of guy he was. there is another dinner at claridge is in the west end of london and period was hosted by the leaders of the british press, the publishers, the editors, the distinguished writers. churchill wasn't there. hopkins was the guest of honor. and so that journalists would do the lake and what he said that he was asked to make some after dinner remarks and he went around the table, speaking softly, looking at a set, shiny and 86. he gave them the sons that while america was not yet in the war, she was marching to save them in the british old. and then one of the journalists wrote, we are happy then all. her courage and confidence have been stimulated by a contact, which shakespearean henry the fifth had a phrase, a little touch of harry mma. the hopkins touches not know, nor was it la
is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are rapidly going backwards. far backwards. the only battle is the battle on the street. >> greece is trying to keep a lid on things. mass transit strike in the second week. officials say they will jail workers if they don't go back on the job. greeks are tired. this is a hassle but what can we do? >> this is watched by the u.s. wall street buffeted by the european trouble. washington planning austerity moves and taxes and all are hoping what has happened in europe isn't a preview of years to come. bret? >> bret: greg palkot in london. thanks. >>> you have heard the talk is cheap. the promises are not. concerns entitlements and how to pay for them. jim angle says the president didn't shed light on that earlier in week. >> treated like innellis. he had several issues in inaugural address but one in particular stuck out to some. comment about entitlement. s. >> the commitment we make to each other, through medicare and soc
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
, mary jane deeb, immediately implicate eu? >> well, because once you attack the infrastructure which produces oil, gas and which link africa to europe, then you can create havoc in the institution of oil. and so it is important. i mean the french understood the importance of the movement in mali. they understood that as professor vandewalle was saying that once you have a movement, once you take over power w it's not simply, you know, e ploding a car here or there t is actually take over power in mali, then similar movements would be allowed to do the same in the region. >> suarez: so you buy it that the algerians under muktar are acting under sympathy with those in mali. >> absolutely. i have no doubt that the radical islamists in nrt africa and those who are in neighboring countries including in nigeria are in sympathy. so and this is what the french want to stop. and the algerian government as well. because algeria itself is not that stable and could be further destabilized by the actions. >> suarez: professor, are these forces some kind of network or do they just simply want many
jane deeb immediately implicate eu? >> well because once you attack the infrastructure which produces oil gas and which link africa to europe, then you can create havoc in the institution of oil. and so it is important. i mean the french understood the importance of the movement in mali. they understood that as professor vandewalle was saying that once you have a movement, once you take over power w it's not simply you know e ploding a car here or there t is actually take over power in mali, then similar movements would be allowed to do the same in the region. >> suarez: so you buy it that the algerians under muktar are acting under sympathy with those in mali. >> absolutely. i have no doubt that the radical islamists in nrt africa and those who are in neighboring countries including in nigeria are in sympathy. so and this is what the french want to stop. and the algerian government as well. because algeria itself is not that stable and could be further destabilized by the actions. >> suarez: professor, are these forces some kind of network or do they just simply want many of the same
military efforts. >> of the eu have expressed their solidarity, both with mali and the intervention of france. all of my colleagues, without exception, have highlighted the full support the actions of friends and are thankful that france reacted so quickly. to quote the remarks of one of them, "without france, there would have been no mali." >> mali gained independence from france in 1960. more than 100 people have reportedly been stabbed, shot, or potentially burned to death by a massacre in the syrian city of homes. the attack in a poor area of the city's edge killed 106 people, some of them children, according to the britain-based syrian observatory for human rights. many homes were set on fire and some of the victims' bodies appeared to have been burned. it was unclear whether the attackers were part of the syrian army or members of a militia loyal to president bashar al-assad. widespread violence was reported thursday across syria, with continued bombings by government planes and clashes between troops and anti-government rebels. the obama administration is continuing its push
by the eu, the judge has been sanctioned by the eu. bill: he has a tough, tough reputation too this judge has, and the trial just startek. and his wife is on record as saying that everything that is coming out of there this week is a flat-out lie. what is the motivation beyond iranian media putting this word out, when in fact it's not the case. you're saying now this guy is still in jail, he's behind bars. >> he's in jail, he's facing abuse while he's in prison. and the iranian regime, the revolutionary garcia is trying to utilize the internal media to in order to tamper down any kind of global outreach that is going on media wise. what the iranians are doing through their media is no, no, no we are letting him out in a few days. meanwhile they are beating him. bill: torture. >> this is one of the worst prisons, eye rain and prisons. the media is utilizing a distortion campaign. it's called media advocacy. we are putting up the true facts, iran is distorting it to tamper down media significant in what is becoming a dangerous by the moment situation for the pastor and his family. he's 32 y
that they then find a solution presented to brussels and basically present the rest of the eurozone or the eu with a -- do you think this criticism is justified? >> certainly this is a point of criticism that's made outside of germany and france but that's made inside germany and france. some politicians frmt call for widening of the partnerships such as poll left-hand looking towards the east or spain or italy. even more so in the french population. there's a call of widening this partnership. as i've said, france and germany often do have contradictory policy positions. so other countries can really find themselves within these positions, i think. so at the end of the day, it's not so much i think a question of content, but rather a question of style. so what germany and france need to make sure is that they do show leadership, as i've said, to their political and economic weight, but they do find the balance between leadership and dominance because surely dominance is not what either of the two countries or any country in europe would want. >> lead but don't -- >> back to you. >> thank you
to -- ountries that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure -- in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. -- you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. -- hoping that that maxim that politics ends at the water's edge was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was "what difference a
that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was i think it makes a big difference. i think it matters a great deal at the american people get the truth. i think they have the right to be told the
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
pleated, we still have those countries that aspear to ascend ancy into the e.u. i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership. i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. i just want to thank you for your leadership of the european affairs subcommittee you've done a tremendous job working on it and i look forward to working with you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your global experience, your depth of knowledge in these areas. i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee and i'm going to enjoy working with you as secretary of state. as you said, these are complex issues and these are dangerous times. i certainly grew up hoping that that maxim of politics ends at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was but it's something to aspear to. we have the same goals, we want a prosperous and secure am
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
sessions already with our eu partners on doing exactly that. one interesting aspect you raised is those have not necessarily included the private sector or the critical infrastructure sectors. expanding the aperture to do that would make sense. >> in our last few minutes, thank you offer very important questions. secretary naplitano, as the content your future -- as you think about your future and some of the unfinished business, what is your highest priority? >> i think when i look at where i will be spending my time, aside from the management integration type issues, i think the coming immigration debate is something that we will be deeply involved in. we have deep and wide experience in those issues. cyber, we have already mentioned. then the constantly evolving types of terrorists threats and hamdi can better educate ourselves -- and how we can better educate ourselves, trained law enforcement, ascertain from history and otherwise what are better ways to identify behavior's indicate -- in take up potential violence, those are the things that concern me -- ways to identify and behavi
decisions beyond that. it is now for a eu states coming up at the 12th of march deadline whether or not they want to amend that in any way. it could be an unmanned -- amended so it would apply to the regime and not to opposition forces. it could be amended in many other ways. it would require the agreement of all member states. >> i understand we are already supplying equipment to elements within the surreal -- syria opposition. i am interested to know, that could be military. how strict is this embargo? is it possible if we are giving communications equipment that could be used a in conjunction with weaponry supplied by turkey? or some other countries to elements within the opposition? >> it is not military. it is certainly not lethal. the assistance includes things like the deployment of our response team to work with their opposition on their future plans. how they are getting help to people with basic needs. we are training through citizen journalist. we are providing water purification hits and generators to help civilians. -- water purification kits and generators to help c
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)